Late Summer/Early Fall Pest Alert: Fall Webworm

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Fall Webworm

Fall is approaching and a common garden pest, the fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea) can become noticeable on trees, causing unsightly larval nests covering entire branches, resulting in stress to the tree and severe leaf damage. Fall webworm are caterpillars that weave loose webbing around the tree’s outer foliage while feeding on leaves, compared to tent caterpillars that appear in spring and build their more opaque nests within the inner crotch of the branches. The webworm caterpillar is approximately one inch in length with a light greenish-yellow body and black to reddish head. Adults emerge later on as white moths with dark spots on their wings.

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Fall Webworm Caterpillar

The best way to eliminate fall webworm is to remove the infected branches immediately, before the larvae hatch and take over the tree. If the caterpillars have already left the nest, it is recommended to spray with an organophosphate insecticide such as Acephate (contained in Orthene or Sevin) or Malathion. Acephate is both a foliar and soil systemic which keeps on working 10–15 days after application. Malathion is a foliar insecticide which is also commonly used, but note that Malathion may leave a residue. The best proactive method of killing overwintering larvae is to apply a dormant oil in early spring while the tree is dormant. Dormant oil is a more natural solution and works by smothering and killing the overwintering eggs.

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Fall Webworm Adult Moth (Source: Wikimedia Commons Author TampAGS, for AGS Media)

In the spring, adult moths emerge and deposit eggs, continuing the life cycle of the caterpillar. These caterpillars may go through as many as eleven growth stages before leaving the web.

For more information on gardening tips and design inspiration, visit my author page or the links below.

A Guide to Northeastern Gardening: Journeys of a Garden Designer Zones 3-9

Landscape Design Combinations

Author:  Lee@Landscape Design By Lee 2018. All Rights Reserved.

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Book Announcement! My First Published Book!

FotorCreated BOOK PROMO 2 600 pixAfter two years of working on my book I am excited to announce that it is finally published! A Guide to Northeastern Gardening: Journeys of a Garden Designer is a comprehensive guide to gardening in plant hardiness zones 3-9.  My goal for the book is to share information on a number of gardening topics based on my experiences as a landscape designer over the years.BOOK PHOTO

A Little Bit About the Book:

A Guide to Northeastern Gardening is a comprehensive guide of valuable information on plants hardy in a range of zones from 3-9, and gardening techniques backed up by my own personal experiences as a professional landscape designer, along with answers to frequently asked questions. Learn about landscape design principles, butterfly gardening, deer resistant plants, long blooming perennials, globe and weeping evergreens, flowering trees and shrubs, native plantings, shade gardening and more. Whether you are a novice or experienced gardener, A Guide to Northeastern Gardening will help you to create your own dream garden. Come along on my journey into the world of gardening!

A Little Bit About the Author:

Lee Miller is a professional landscape/garden designer involved in the horticultural industry since 1996. Having started a gardening blog in 2010, she is the author of over 150 articles on general gardening, landscape design principles, gardening tips, planting, pruning, garden maintenance, feature plants and more. Her published book, “A Guide to Northeastern Gardening”, is an accumulation of information touching on a wide variety of gardening topics, all backed up by her own personal experiences.

Previews and further information are available on the following links:

Updated for 2016: Now in Amazon Softcover!

Amazon Kindle

Also here is a link to the full story behind the author and the book. I hope to share my gardening experiences with you!

As Always…Happy Gardening!

2015 Lee@ A Guide to Landscape Design & Maintenance.

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May Garden Planting & Maintenance Tips

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May is a great time for planting when the temperatures are in the 70’s.  Here are some useful tips.

PLANTING DEPTH OF TREES :  One of the leading causes of death for trees is incorrect planting. Large tree spades are often used to dig trees that cause the soil level to rise up covering the crown of the root ball. Plant your tree slightly above the soil surface so that you see a visible flare above the ground. When mulching make sure that the mulch does not come up above the root crown. Following these simple practices will help to ensure the health and life of your tree.

WATERING:  Water throughly after planting and keep well watered throughout the first growing season. Be careful not to over water! Feel down by the roots to determine whether the plant is getting the correct moisture. Soil should appear moist but not wet or overly dry. Consider type of soil, time of year and amount of sun and rain.  Watering every other day at approximately forty minutes per zone allows the water to penetrate deep enough to the roots.  If you do not have a sprinkler system the use of soaker hoses is recommended. Water should be applied at a rate of 3/4 inch of water every three days or 1 1/2 inches a week. (One inch of water goes down 6 ” into the soil.)

PRUNING EVERGREENS: Most evergreens can be pruned at any time of year except when the weather is too hot or right before temperatures start to drop below freezing.  Ideally, late winter and early spring are best.  Most evergreens will not take well to hard pruning.  The only exception is Taxus (Yew) which may rejuvenate over time. No plant is completely maintenance free so keep your evergreens trimmed to their desired size. This will also keep them full and healthy and prevent thinning out. NOTE: Evergreens will shed their needles or foliage in the Fall/Spring to allow for new growth. If any branches appear brown or dead after planting or after winter, trim them off and allow the plant to rejuvenate. When in doubt ask a professional.

PRUNING FLOWERING SHRUBS: Prune flowering shrubs and flowering evergreens after the bloom. Flowering shrubs such as hydrangea bloom on the last years growth and will not bloom if cut back in Spring with the exception of the Endless Summer Collection which blooms on new wood (click on hyperlink for article on pruning all types of hydrangea). Prune Lilac for shape after flowering in spring.

FERTILIZING: Feed plants in spring.  For new plantings allow the plantings to become established then apply a slow release organic fertilizer or apply a “starter” formula when planting. For established plants there are several products on the market. Be careful not to buy a concentrated product that will burn the roots. A slow release or organic fertilizer such as Holly Tone is recommended. Also when planting, a mixture of hydro-gel along with a slow release fertilizer will help to retain moisture in your plants.

INSECT CONTROL: Periodically check your plants for insect or fungal damage and treat if needed. It is advised to use a regular insect control maintenance program to keep your plantings healthy.

LAWN CARE: Ideally sod lawns are best planted in spring and seed best planted in the fall. Your lawn should also have a regular maintenance program to keep it at its best-ask your professional.

Author:  Lee@Landscape Design By Lee, 2013, All Rights Reserved

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April Garden Maintenance Tips-Happy Spring!

crocusSpring has arrived and there is much to do in the garden.  As the temperatures rise up into the 50’s and 60’s here on Long Island here are some April maintenance tips to get your garden off to a good start.

(1)  Clean up garden beds and remove debris from over the winter.  Allow foliage from daffodils, crocus and hyacinths to yellow and brown before removing so that energy can go back into the bulbs for next year.

(2)  Pinch back cool weather blooms such as pansies to get maximum bloom span.

(3) Remove germinating weeds before they start to flower and re-seed.

(4)  Divide and transplant perennials such as hosta, liriope and lilies once you see 3-4 inches of new growth. Dig a larger hole to transplant into, apply a slow release plant food and water in thoroughly.

(5) Re-Edge and mulch all beds.  Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs soon after bloom.

(6) It’s time to uncover fig trees or to bring them outside once the threat of freezing temperatures is over.

(7) Start cold weather vegetables such as peas, lettuce, carrots, beets, spinach and turnips.

(8) Apply pre-emergent crabgrass killer to lawn in mid to late April (after forthysia bloom) and fertilize.

(9) Fertilize roses.  There are many rose foods on the market.  A slow-release granular form is recommended.

(10)  Begin planting new perennials towards the end of the month.

A little pro-active garden maintenance goes a long way in maintaining the vigor of your plants and beauty of your garden.  Now that the chill is out of the air it is time to get out into the garden and enjoy all that it has to offer.

Happy Gardening!

Author:  Lee@Landscape Design By Lee, 2013, All Rights Reserved

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