Perennial Nutsedge Alert: One determined Weed

nutsedge 1
Nutsedge Perennial Weed

If you see an unknown plant emerging in your garden or lawn that looks like this…it is known as Nutsedge, also known as nutgrass. Nutsedge is an erect, grass-llke perennial member of the sedge family. It emerges as a pale green spike starting in late May and is similar in appearance to a grass seedling. When a shoot reaches the surface, it forms a basal bulb which grows into a new plant, including roots that develop new tubers at their ends. This process takes approximately three weeks and the plant spreads rapidly throughout the summer months. Nutsedge does die back in winter when frost kills all top growth; however, most of the viable tubers will survive and sprout the following spring.

nutsedge 2
Nutsedge Perennial Weed

If you see nutsedge in summer the best remedy is to remove it immediately, making sure to get all the roots and tubers. Tubers will be well beneath the soil and white shoots will be visible after pulling out the main plant.  Be sure to get all the new shoots and check regularly to see if any plants re-emerge.  The use of selective herbicides over the past twenty years has reduced competition from other weeds and allowed nutsedge to grow and spread more easily. Once established, this weed can be hard to control because its tubers have high energy reserves, multiple buds, and a long sprouting period. An addition, the tubers are resistant to systemic herbicides because the chemicals travel from the top growth of the plant into the roots and rhizomes but not into the tubers, which multiply. The most effective treatment is application of a pre-emergent in early spring.

nutsedge 3
Nutsedge Perennial Weed

When nutsedge matures in the perennial border it develops long shiny leaves that resemble the foliage of daylillies.  It also produces flower spikes in late summer as seen above, which can be misleading.  Keeping on the lookout, along with a little proactive maintenance, will prevent this determined weed from taking over your landscape.

2015 Lee@ A Guide to Landscape Design & Maintenance.

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